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Follow These Critical Guidelines for Proper Sterilization

Ensure Infection Prevention and Avoid Innocent Mistakes with a Refresher on the Sterilization Process

The sterilizer is a key component of any dental practice’s infection prevention procedures. After cleaning instruments to remove any residues or heavy contamination using other tools, such as automatic cleaners, it’s the sterilizer that does the heavy lifting of neutralizing infectious microorganisms and readying instruments for recirculation.

Has Your Dental Unit Waterline Become a Bacterial Metropolis? ecervello@hu-f… Mon, 07/15/2019 - 20:21

Everything You Need to Know to Keep Your Dental Waterlines Clean

For decades, dental professionals have known microorganisms were colonizing the waterlines of their dental units. Ample evidence shows the narrow tubing, low flow rates, and frequent stagnation periods found in water delivery systems create the ideal metropolis for biofilms. These slimy mats of bacteria cling to the walls of the plastic tubes, sloughing off countless individual organisms into the water as it passes by.

Infection Prevention – Is Your Practice Doing Enough? kbrown@hu-friedy.com Mon, 06/17/2019 - 16:57

Compliance Enters the Digital Age with the GreenLight Dental Compliance Center™ by Hu-Friedy

Ask any dentist about their infection prevention program, and they’re likely to express confidence that they’re fully compliant with all relevant regulations. But is that really the case? The slow drip of infection prevention breach stories making news around the country would suggest that compliance is more of an issue than some would like to admit.

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Getting A Dirty Job Done. The Easy Way!

Quick tips to make your instrument processing thorough and safe

If you've ever watched the reality television show Dirty Jobs, you've probably concluded that dirty jobs are fun to watch or learn about, but not to do. However, these so-called "dirty jobs" play vital roles in society, keeping a world on the move going. When you think about it, especially on a microscopic level, instrument reprocessing is a dirty job, too, with countless microbes and organic debris being removed from the surfaces of instruments.